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in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. like grover is stuck with this pledge he made everybody take which is that they have to go over the cliff beca
the actual global land scape is looking like from europe to here in the u.s.? >> well, i just spent two weeks in europe, and i don't think things are as bad in europe as a lot of people do. liz: why not? >> the politicians, the bankers and the bureaucrats are the same in europe as they are here. they don't want to lose their jobs, and they're going to continue to paper over this and try to buy time just like we did in our fiasco in '07, '08 and '09. david: david, on the other hand, some people would say what they're doing is stunting growth, raising tax rates, something that may stunt our growth as well. you say that this bull market is overbought right now. it's about to end. why and how sharp a correction are you expecting? >> well, we believe that the high of 12 weeks ago was probably the high for the whole recovery cycle the that started in march of '09. remember that the u.s. stock market was the only market in the world that made a new high this year. we were the best looking house on a very bad looking street. and we believe that the market is overvalued perhaps 20-30%, but we also bel
keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >> apple as we mentioned in the spotlight today, shares of the tech giant coming off their worst day in four years, sliding back into bear market territory. the one day loss erased nearly $35 billion in market cap. that chunk is bigger than 400 other s&p 500 companies. apple ceo tim cook talked to nbc's brian williams in our rock center exclusive. >> why can't you be a made in america company? >> you know, this i found, as a matter of fact, the engine in here is made in america. and not only are the engines in here made in america, but engines are made in america and are exported. the glass on this phone is made in kentucky. so we have been working for years on doing more and more in the united states, next year, we will do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. >> you can see the entire interview with tim cook tonight on rock center, that's 10:00 eastern time on your local nbc station, but for now
for 2012, up the russell 2000 up 12 percentage points, the s&p up 31, -- s&p up 11. but it's europe, europe actually ended up looking pretty darn good. germany up 30%. i mean, i look at that, and i say all of the fear that was out there including the euro stocks, 600 did unbelievably beautifully. and you say, my goodness, if you went toward the worst, most fearsome place, europe, you would have done way better than here in the u.s.. >> yeah, absolutely. well, it's like everything that happens in nature as well as the markets and the equity markets. when things get stretched too far one way, they will come back to a happy medium. we saw that in the equity markets this year. they were the best performing asset classes of all the places you could put your money, and it's not without knowing what's going on when you had unprecedented types of money flows coming from central banks around the globe, that money had to go somewhere. the u.s. market has performed very well. by the time we get done today, especially on the fiscal cliff talks, we're going to be up about 14% in the s&p 500. the leaders
america will benefit and have a positive economic gain if we export lng offshore to europe, and or asia and to other countries that need our gas. melissa: we have so much natural gas unlocked as a result of fracking, the problem is, intellectually, emotionally we can never wrap our heads on exporting energy. we're sure we have to keep it all for ourselves. do you think we can get over the hurdle, and that the president and washington in general can get over that hurdle? >> that is a great point, melissa. what you're describe something protectionism. you're right, america has a history of wanting to protect our assets and i think that's great but i think the scenario we're looking at now is unprecedented. america has so much natural gas i think we can fuel our transportation, power generation and domestic energy needs and actually export the surplus. it could be a cake and eat it too scenario. within eight years or now seven years as we turn into the new 2013 year it could be $50 billion economic impact to this country. so we're tripping over dollars to try to save pennies. weemight be a
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to happen in europe about the future whether their taxes are going to go aboard not. the problem is if you are holding on to your cash because darrell issa fear you are losing money. is that -- can you get that message out? is there a way to address the people who are so fearful, who don't want to risk a lot of their money but to recognize it just to leave it stand is not helping them at all. >> i appreciate your question. this gets to the heart of the question. people getting so focus on the fiscal cliff that they are missing the big picture. the big picture we are delivered in one way or the other when you think of things in three frameworks the the supergood growth middle and growth dealing with fiscal the leveraging in a small amount and the downside of the fiscal cliff. the first category is not something we can really obtain. the other two are the more likely categories and they are the way to invest in those areas and the portfolio of getting returned in those areas -- [talking over each other] liz: they fan your portfolio. >> they need to give away the more distant up side. don't b
. >> austerity, is the fiscal cliff sort of like austerity? >> absolutely. >> and europe haven't done so severely. >> that's the point. maybe we can put this off, but you can't put off reality. you're going to pay the piper. the question is the creation of washington of the fiscal cliff or a creation of your investors and bondholders across the world that look at you in the same light as europe some day. we all know that day isn't here. this is a lesson for the republican party, and i think it's a lesson we should all take. instead of when we look at all these programs, mark, where are we going to make cuts and how terrible is this going to be, we need to judge our concern and empat empathy, not by the money, something marco rubio and paul ryan talked about, by the outcomes, not how much we spend but what we get out of it. look at something how much money we throw at it we'll august suggest more, more, more. >> government does such a good job tracking outcomes. >> let's track the outcomes of tax loopholes so if we're going to evaluate outcomes it's important to evaluate the outcomes of tax loopho
things worse. europe is doing it, southern europe. it keeps raising. the economy contracts even more. about to go in recession. japan raising taxes. why in the world we would apply that poison to ourselves. lori: that is the ultimatum from the white house, as you know. because of the president's reelection they have the leverage. so are the republicans going to have any choice but to cave especially on the issue of raising taxes for higher-income americans? >> well, there are small business owners. 63 percent, and people who create capitol, invest capital. we have seen in europe and france especially, that kind of thing does not work. he does not have a mandate to hurt the economy which is the way the republicans should phrase this thing. why harm the economy now. lori: edges of the economy fall off the cliff to iraq or raising the tax on the wealthy. >> with the republicans should do, making the point they're raising taxes is a bad thing to do, let's postpone this bank. better to do that than to give poison to the patient now. our economy is starting to slow again. give people pause
, china, europe, whatever, the s&p 500 up 12.1% year to date. that is a good year. that is an optimistic year. why is that? >> it seems like we're forgetting about that, doesn't it? with all this talk about what's happening going forward and concern about corporate growth. and truly, we're concerned about corporate growth as well because there really hasn't been that long-term information from our government, from our policyholde policyholders, no economic policy in real investment in assets that we've seen. that's going to be a problem going forward, not to mention the global slowdown, and we're hitting the top of corporate profits now. >> so you don't agree with this. you're turning bearish. >> not bearish in a sense of going forward intermittently. we think that most likely, we're going to see some growth hitting in the second quarter of next year. until we get through this fiscal cliff nonsense, until we see some growth coming out of china and europe, i think that -- >> china i think is showing growth. europe may not show growth in my lifetime, but they're going to be bailed out. do
of the year. we have so much uncertainty in washington. we do have slowing economies in europe and in the u.s. >> right. david, what do you say right now? break the tie for us. >> break the tie. in the near term, there's an epic tug of war between extremely aggressive monetary easing and just total disdain for what they're doing in washington on tax and regulatory policy. in the near term, the fiscal cliff prevails. in the longer term, the fed will prevail. there's so much mistrust on stocks that i think that still can be a positive catalyst for stocks relative to traditional bonds over the next 12 months. >> i'm going to push back a little bit on that. >> i'm going to break the tie in ralph's favor. >> david, i want to push back a little bit on that. in terms of -- like, is the fed really that much of a factor these days now in terms of keeping the market afloat? >> absolutely. >> it's not losing its bang for its buck? >> it's not as powerful as it was in the fall of 2008 or even 2010, but when you consider that, u.s., long bonds, 1.5%. short-term interest rates, zero. negative on an infla
're beginning to look a little like europe. they are punting. >> the market, as we saw in europe, they rallied the market ahead of what they thought was going to be a deal, kicked the can down the road. in fact, if that's the case. michael may be right there's going to be a framework but not a deal, yes, we rallied the market, they will become disappointed and take it back. >> that's not the case. if you look at what's happening, economy better, earnings solid, interest rates are low. the fed probably this week will announce they are going to continue their policies to flood the system with money. >> but there's your answer. the fed is going to keep pumping the system with money. fundamentally are we really where we should be. >> we're not talking about fundamentals. we're talking about what the market is going to do. there's reality and what the market is going to be. if there's free money, we might be broke but there's free money. >> all right. that sounds like a good recipe. michael, we'll have you back later in the hour. >> kenny, do you buy into the rally. >> you buy into the rally becaus
't chuck out a guy and hope that this doesn't come back to bite you. stuart: and europe remains ubergreen-- and sorry to use the words-- and ubergreen. yes, we've cut carbon emissions, but shipped more to china and india than the u.s. has. remember, whereas we've paid a lot of money to cut our carbon emixes the u.s. is cutting more by using fracked gas cut more than europe and-- >> environmentalists don't want fracking, the water and the-- >> there are problems with fracked gas, but amaze lig green option for the next ten years and that's one thing that europe doesn't get. and china and india do. stuart: move to america and fracking and-- >> thank you very much indeed, sir. new at 10, listen to this, united states the land of opportunity, oh, yes, for some chinese tourists they're take full advantage of the hospitality. a so-called maternity hotel where chinese mothers are paying to stay and have their babies, instant citizens. good story and it's new at 10. also, time is money, as you well know. so, here in 30 seconds is what else we're watching for you. the tax the rich crowd has gone t
minister resignation soon and the impact on europe's debt crisis. crude and in the day down $0.37 $85.56 per barrel. gasoline has come down $0.10 over the past few weeks. korn falling to a three-week low so far i'm growing demand overseas for supplies from the u.s. soybeans also dropping on slowing demand. david: peter kenny, to see his communicates, some of the best material on what is happening in the market around the world. we have him here live. and peter barnes with the latest developments on the fiscal cliff negotiations, but let's art in chicago with john, two very interesting situations continuing, drama over the fiscal cliff in d.c. and also this week we have the fed meeting. which is more important to the market? >> eventually it will be the fiscal cliff that is more important to the market, but make no doubt about it, the fed meeting with the announcement wednesday morning and wednesday afternoon is going to continue to support risk assets. you were talking about how the dollar is melting up for the fourth consecutive day. the federal reserve will make a very active effort
economic times in europe and also the cooling of the luxury goods boom have really taken their toll. i believe consumption is expected to get better going into the beginning of the year, new year's and popping all and all of that kind of thing. still, even with that, it's not going to be enough to lift overall sales from a year earlier. and what's really interesting, chris, is that a downturn in -- it really shows that this drop in champagne shows that champagne's fortunes are very closely tied to europe's economic health and to the confidence of french consumers who account for half of champagne sales. >> all those bubbly french people. thank you so much. who knew that half of champagne sales are in france. thank you, mandy. >> thank you. >>> in the mood for a great burger to go with your champagne? food and wine is out with a list of best burgers. minetta tavern in new york city, in-in-out burger in california and michael's genuine food and zuni cafe in san francisco. there's a whole list on our website. raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economi
with modest gains. europe holding onto gains and china up nearly 3% over night as shanghai catches a break. our road map begins with a $20 billion deal. freeport mcmoran getting into the energy business making two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in media. pandora ceo joins us live later this morning as the stock fell nearly 20% on weak guidance and netflix signs a big exclusive with disney. how much are they having to pay up for that? >>> let's deal with this big deal. as i've been telling you we'll see a lot of big deals -- i was wrong. here we are. freeport mcmoran buying not one but two companies. the combined price if you add it all together gets close to $20 billion. that does include debt. let's go through some of the details. it's somewhat complex. let's
from its oil exports. 9% of which are purchased by europe. president bashar al-asaad ruled for 12 years after assuming the presidency under questionable circumstances can argue. regime allies aloud him to take office at 32 years old. he was approved by a voter referendum of yes or no. martha: he rarely appears in public. january 11 he addressed a public rally in the capital city of damascus. after that march 27 he visited a former rebel stronghold to allegedly inspect the conditions there. his most recent appearance on june 3, he spoke before syria's parliament. we covered it here on fox. in that speech he denied reports his government massacred rebel fighters and civilians and he accused foreign terrorists of plotting to destroy his country. bill: . the government moving defense missiles to turkey. it will be defensive posture only. the western alliance is set to okay those weapons. the patriot missiles not expected to arrive in turkey until next month. martha: let's go to egypt which is also very volatile at the moment. the presidential palace is looking like an armed palace. they sta
surpassed north maeshg and europe combined in terms of global power, based upon gdp, population size, military spending and technological spending. china alone will probably have the largest economy, surpassing that of the united states a few years before 2030. people because of technology, people really have more power than they've ever had before, individuals have more power an that can also cause problems with, you know, people using technology for ill means. >> is this the whole report? >> the 140-page rundown. i'm sure the president gets a bigger one. >> this is an intelligence report. >> yes. >> why on earth would anyone buy a jillion dollar card for starbucks. >> this is the question of the surgery. they had a $450 stainless steel elite card. now they're on ebay getting them for maybe $1,000. some is of the bids are up to $1,000. it's collectors item for the to be 1%. these starbucks limited edition gift cards have sparked a frenzy on ebay of people who want to hold on to this. >> it's the perfect gift for people who like to buy overpriced coffee already. >> you get perks, lik
new sources of revenue. and cutting spending as well. >> very interesting. europe is deep, deep in a financial crisis and ms. lagarde, who heals from tax the rich, 75% france is lecturing america, very interesting. >> meanwhile, european markets are down and because the italian prime minister mario monti m a surprise. is going to resign. and silvio berlusconi wants to replace him. europe is appalled. and people blaming the recession for not having more children. 64 births for one thousand women of child bearing age. half of the peak of the baby boom in the 1950's. our next guest has six children, counts them. and what's that-- >> and naham segal. that works. >> have i got that word? >> and light tte candles. >> if you light them i will come. >> you have six children. >> as do you. >> leave me out of this. >> and others people say they can't afford it you're saying it doesn't matter if you can afford them or not. >> if the price tag of having a child scares you the most, you haven't done the right gut test. stuart: so, go ahead and have the children whether you can afford them or
: they wait until after the new year. are we still the best of the bunch question that europe is still a mess. how is china doing? >> we are actually doing the best. just look at china. the chinese economy is actually not doing that well. there are a lot of complex. the new party just took over the control. there are a lot of things to figure out. the u.s. is in the best condition right now. we have to get past this fiscal cliff and move on. connell: we probably would be talking a lot more about china and the transition of power and how president obama is supposed to do without. when you say there are economy is not doing that great, does that mean it is in jeopardy of a tough all, or it will hang in there? >> i think it will hang in there. china, i think, will grow. reasonably, i have seen some analysts come out and be pretty bullish. their economy, the outlook is willing not that bright. although, they probably will not fall hard. china is sort of setting their status quo. i think the u.s., again, back to the u.s., they have to get their act together. connell: a few days after the end of th
in europe, spain, portugal, yes, operationsy, italy. it measures the perception of the corruption in the public sector. as the most corrupt nations in the world. here we go. afghanistan, north korea, and somalia top the list. on the other side of the spectrum, countries with least perceived corruption, denmark, fin left-hand and new zealand. where does the u.s. rank? 19th. tracy: nobody lives in those countries. ashley: what they do is very simple and very clean. tracy: very blond. ashley: very blond. definitely in denmark and finland, that's for sure. tracy: the dark skin, the dark eyes. we're all evil at heart. ashley: that is the quote of the day. thanks, tracy. i didn't say that. tracy: all right. quarter after. come on. right? think about it. as we do every 15 minutes we check on the markets, nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. from the most corrupt country in europe, good to have you with us. >> that is me. evil. i'm a little devil at heart. let's take a look at a big deal here. freeport-mcmoran, this is a $9 billion deal. these type of things brin
is set to open below 13,000. markets in europe mixed after a shortened session in the uk, france and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if thi
&p looks attractive. the other thing is the policy mandate in places like europe believe it or not for the first time in a really long time they actually may be clearer than the u.s. >> chris, is there something about the fiscal cliff, deal or no deal, that makes you concerned about u.s. equities versus international ones? >> well, yes. but i think it's a relative concern. because i think risk assets around the world are attractively valued right now. but you're absolutely right. regardless of what sort of deal we get today or in the next three months, the fact of the matter is it will have an adverse impact next year. the question is is it going to be bad enough to throw the country into recession or not? we suspect not. and you're seeing today that it looks like a -- that both political sides have been able to find common ground on the tax issue which we think is pertinent in erm thes of the economic impact. but having said that, again, the policy response we think in europe ever since draghi has been in has been consistent and very conducive to risk markets going up. >
of the biggest unions larry. he said in western europe, they may have higher unemployment but they have less inequality. this is what the agenda is all about. in a practical way, suppose you have a successful person. he or she want to build a house. to do that you might hire 15, 20, 25 people. you got a whole army of people who would go to work. but if you get taxed, you might not guy that house. and you won't build. that is the kind of logic i'm not hearing. dow think they get that? >> they don't. i saw lincoln. remember during the debate in 2008 charlie gibson asked the then president obama why raise capital gains? he said it is about social justice and fairness. it doesn't matter that it doesn't work. what counts to these people is class and attacking this rich guy and this poor person who doesn't have much money. but the guy is on the margin of poverty. would love to go to work as a landscaper in this hypothetical home that i am describing. the guy on the margin, they would love to work like that. so, there is a connection there and i don't see why washington our friends on the democrati
reports on in europe and their work rules. from london, what do they get that we don't? >> european workers have the right to and protection of gainful unemployment. the minimum guaranteed staycation is 20 days paid not including weekend, additional time off , holidays. at france it starts at 25 per good european court of justice added on another to give a workers the right to to a vacation to over or give back. >> for instance it used the for two weeks for your christmas holiday and use brain drain gold and the last eight-- you are laid up that means they automatically go into your sickly youth then you could have the vacation do over to make up for those days that you weren't that sec or hurt. john: if you say i have they cold? they have to give you that back? >> if it is dead doctor's note to to say she got the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes.
prosecution of europe's largest bank might destablize the global system. >>> that closes the books on the biggest bailout. the government's 16% stake is worth almost $8 billion. >> made a profit off of that deal. >>> thanks to the surge in online shopping, shipping services expecting a record-setting year. a record number of packages are in the fedex pipeline after its busiest shipping day ever. abc news got a special look inside its global hub in the city of memphis. by yesterday afternoon, more than 19 million packages had been shipped. 10% more than the busiest day last year. business is up. >> mind-boggling. >>> facebook and gmail seem to be all right this morning. but both services had brief outages. some users had problems with google calendar and documents for about an hour. there's no word from google about the cause. facebook said it changed a web address. that outage lasted 20 long minutes. >>> and pepsi's latest global partner is my girlfriend, beyonce. beside her appearance at the pepsi halftime show at the super bowl, the singer will appear on everything from soda cans
doing a 5-500-day trip. that's when ships left europe and didn't plan to come back for years. >> i'm looking at the scene where you tell gabby, hey, i'm off to mars for 500 days. >> yeah, i don't think she would be digging it all that much. >> tell me about your mousetrout. why did you decide to do this? ? >> on my first space flight we carried mice on the trip and 17 of them did not like it and some of them enjoyed the experience. >>. >> it's a lot of fun. it's a lot of fun. i'm going to show it to my little daughter. mark, it's great to talk with you again. send my very best to gabby. how's she doing? >> she's doing very well, piers. you know, she's got a great attitude about her recovery, about where she's going. you know, she's getting involved in not exactly back to work but we've been involved in a new organization called the national institute for civil discourse. >> that's great. nice to talk to you. >> thanks for having me on, piers. appreciate it. >>> that's all for now. "ac 360" starts in a few moments. [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have
while high while illegal research shows more drivers are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana affects coordination and judgment. >> a reduced ability to divide one's attention. >> reporter: marijuana advocates argue marijuana is less debilitating than alcohol. but a new study shows those who drive within 3 hours of smoking pot are at a greater risk of causing a crash. >> it inhibits the ability to jump the judge time and distance. >> reporter: in state where marijuana is legal, the level is 5 man or grams. the impairment some argue is equal to alcohol. >> it's difficult to determine whether that five nanograms will change. >> reporter: heavy users though not impaired can test positive weeks after smoking. also what you smoke and how you smoke it affects people differently. even experts don't know how much pot causes impairment. >> two dosages would give me 5 nanograms. it's impossible to make that determination. >> reporter: the bottom line is this is going to be litigated. the pot people want it at 10 nanograms and it's at 5. megyn: coming up. how does amer
coming under pressure recently starting to turn. europe seeing improvement helping equities along as well. lori: not sure if you mentioned the fed. we were talking about it at the top. talking about their expectations of ben bernanke. nicole: would even throw out the idea of stimulus? that helped things along pushing us along throughout this entire last six months. lori: absolutely. thank you so much, nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. protests turn violent in lansing, michigan, as union protesters ripped down a tent belonging to right-to-work supporters. becoming the 24th right-to-work states today allowing workers to get the right to join unions. jeff flock is in lansing michigan covering the story for us. i thought it was interesting how you covered the scene there with michigan a few years back, excuse me, wisconsin. >> wisconsin, exactly. not the same kind of intensity. part of that is because this is already pretty much a done deal. there they had not a teacher headed off. the second one being debated right now. but renew over here to the scene of the geo
to take down a jet liner in europe or africa. >> seth, isn't that the problem? what we saw in libya was all those weapons have gone missing. now they're elsewhere in northern africa and some got into the hands of hamas in gaza. syria seems to be libya on steroids in terms of the things that could go wrong. >> i think it's kind of ludicrous to provide them with surface to air missiles. i think what they need more than anything else is ammunition and small arms. they can do a lot with just that kind of activity. and really intelligence. especially with the internet going down, it's harder for them to communicate with each other. radios are down across the country. they need help in a range of ways. i think our intelligence apparatus and our special operations units can do this in general and have done this clandestinely over the years, so i think we can do this and provide some oversight. >> if we do it, do we have -- will it have any impact on the outcome? the u.s. does think strategically. like it or not, they do. if i'm giving you a gun, are you going to do something when you get i
spending cuts. that's the austerity trap that europe has found itself in, and it would be crazy for us to go in that direction. >> before we go, very quickly, yes or no. do we have a deal by the end of the year? >> yes. >> and what about you, doug? >> marginally, yes. 60/40 in favor of a deal but they've got to get moving. >> we'll have to see if it's a real deal or another kick of the can down the road or some other interim thing. thanks for being here. >>> "outfront" next, the u.s. military draws up new plans for a potential strike against syria as we learn more about that country's stockpile of chemical weapons. >>> plus -- the u.s. supreme court agrees to take on the issue of gay marriage. and is that a signal, is that a signal that for republicans, it may be time to reconsider its view on this? >>> and a nurse duped by a prank call leaking information about the duchess of cambridge is found dead. all of that coming up. [ female announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's heal
to you. europe has seen its own budget crisis over the past few years. are there any valuable take aways that lawmakers in the u.s. could use as guidance? >> i'm not sure. i thought very long and hard since i knew we were discussing this for parallels. and i think what you really come down to is that of compromise. and the ability to do a deal. when in the face of opposition, you just have to get something done because the ramifications are so serious if you don't. in the case of the eurozone, you had 27 countries and nobody could agree and you had different political philosoph s philosophies. that sounds similar to the fiscal cliff and certainly the eurozone pushed things to the absolute limit. almost to breaking point during the summer where again and again they would not agree until disaster was on their doorstep. that's the similarity to what we're seeing tonight. >> i know. we're hearing that negotiations are ongoing. they are continuing. there are a number of issues on both sides. ryan lizza following this. it appears as though obviously some elements of this have to be pushed for
a stomach illness following a whirl wind trip through europe. that virus led to extreme dehydration, which caused her to faint and sustain a concussion. according to doctors at george washington university hospital and mt. kisko medical center, she's been recuperating at home since early december. secretary clinton also suffered a blood clot in her knee when she was first lady. in her autobiography, she said that doctors attribute it to her nonstop flying. now 65 years old clinton's air travel has only increased. illness has sidelined clinton during the final weeks of her term as secretary of state, causing her to cancel a december 20th appearance at congressional hearings into the attack on the benghazi consulate and the announcement of senator john kerry's nomination to succeed her as secretary of state. >> he has a deep respect for the men and women of the state department. >> reporter: clinton's last public appearance was december 7th in belfast, northern ireland. she spoke then about her upcoming retirement and said she looked forward to having time to relax and th
're experiencing now. capital is on strike. much capital is not being created. we see it in western europe. we see it in japan. would apply the same poison here. real people are just debating. how much more burden would we put on already weak economy? david: steve, will republicans cave on the issue of tax rate increases. will they agree with the president and his folks to raise ttx rates? >> the rank-and-file that talk to want to hold fast on that and say, no we're not going to do it. you want to push the economy off the cliff, you're the chief executive. you're supposed to be bringing people together. and put, throw the ball back in his court. david: you think no deal? >> boehner might be willing to do a deal. the rank-and-file wants to hold fast and stick to principle which is rare in washington. david: what is your feeling? do you think we'll go off the cliff? >> i think it will go right to the end. if boehner and senator mcconnell do not cave, i think we'll kick the can down the road. for once that will be a good thing rather than a bad thing. david: steve forbes, forbes media chairman. >> go
that last fact. >> go to europe for that. gerri: exactly that is ridiculous. thanks so much for coming on. great to see you. >> good to see you. gerri: still to come, my two cents more. you may have heard it. "consumer reports" is making a list and checking it twice just like somebody else we know. find out who they think is naughty and who is nice. ♪ . [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? maybe you want to incorporate a business. orrotect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal plan attorney is available in most states with every personalized document to answer questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. gerri: how naughty is your favorite company? "consumer reports" says which ones are cold this christmas on the annual naughty and nice list gerri: bank ever mechanic is throwing in the towel and giving up fight on fees. according to "the wall street journal" it is postponing fees for checking accounts. new fees will be delayed until late next year. the fees would have hit 10 mi
in aid to egypt every year. now europe is calling on the u.s. to stop that. what do you think about that? what is our best move at this point? >> well, let's remember that those 1.6 more or less billion dollars that we've been sending to the egyptian government, to mubarak for last 30 years or so, were sent for egypt to protect the peace with israel. to make sure the suez canal is always open for international trade and maintain security and friendship with the united states. now that morsi and the muslim brotherhood and salafists allies have form ad government, if they win this round against civil society they're going to move egypt toward more extreme allies. eventually the allies of morsi, salafists who attacked us ends at benghazi will turn against us. to make sure the $1.6 billion any dollars sent to egypt will go to a government that remains our ally and protector of freedom and democracy in the country. melissa: how do we do that? is that possible? if we revoke the money are we making the situation even more hostile? like you said the suez canal is very important. morsi was there
't see it as much in the united states and in europe. at red we're focused very much on women, because the majority of people now infected are women, six out of ten in subsaharan africa. so we're trying to do the goal of eliminating mother-child transition of hiv by 2015. and could that be the first of an aids-free generation after 30 years of this plague on the planet, and 30 million people have died, and 34 million still infected. >> what else is red doing today to get the point across, and also how folks can help out? >> well, it's world aids day, and instead of rhetoric and reports and all of those things, which is really important for a transparency to monitor the efficiency of what is going on, you can take action. so we have the number one dance record in the world right now with red. it's electronic dance music, dance red, save lives with the most popular dj in the world, tiesto. so go out and buy from itunes, the record. go to join red.com and buy a lot of red this holiday season. >> red ceo and activist deborah dugan. thank you so much. i do appreciate your time this saturday
and votes coming up this week, secretary of state hillary clinton in europe this week has warned the assad regime and syria against resorting to chemical weapons. >> their behavior is reprehensible. their actions against their own people have been tragic. but there is no doubt that there's a line between even the horrors they have already inflicted on the syrian people and moving to what would be an internationally condemned step of utilizing their chemical weapons. >> joining me is former california congresswoman and president of the woodrow wilson center, jane harman. congresswoman, let's talk first about syria and the chemical weapon threat and all of the pressure now on the u.s. to recognize the opposition and to become more engaged. are there any options that you hear are likely to be taken? >> well, the focus is now on syria. events on the ground are changing. if these published reports are to be believed and there's some efforts to move chemical weapons i believe as hillary clinton has hinted, that will bring the entire international community into this game. that includes russia, w
at the u.s., throw if on a whiteboard, where else are you going to invest? you can't buy bonds, europe, emerging markets. you have to buy equities -- >> corporate bonds. >> maybe as part of that. but in terms of the whole total return funds you're seeing in these bond categories, you've had such rapid inflows, which is clearly a sign of a safety trade and psychological trade. they're not buying bonds based on fundamental but on fear. >> for yield. let's put aside all of this wrangling and let's say we get a deal done. we start to look at what that deal looks like. higher taxes, lower federal spending. right? i mean, when you look -- when you take away all of the fights and when you take away and go to the raw, what is left, you're talking about slower stimulus on a federal level because you've got higher taxes and because you've got lower spending from government. so, doesn't that hit earnings? >> no. here's why. we have found higher taxes are inconsequential with respect to stock market performance. stocks go up because the economy is recovering. if we were talking about the fiscal cl
in europe, when they would support some type of military intervention, would they be with us and under what circumstances, and for what scope of an operation. i'm sure, you know, all of the regional allies that are affected, jordan, turkey, israel, all of them must be spoken to and coordinated with as well. so this is a very difficult sort of multi-layered chess game both for the secretary of state and the secretary of defense, who must also coordinate and try to build coalitions around this in the midst of this crisis. we will be sharing intelligence with our allies, the intelligence agencies will be talking among themselves so they are building a common comprehensive picture of the situation on the ground. so there's a lot of activity that's going on, diplomatically, militarily and in the intelligence circles that we just don't see. >> bob, i almost hate to ask the question but for somebody who is unfamiliar, if assad is mixing sarin gas, were he to use sarin gas, what are we talking about? >> we're talking about the kill radius of a small nuclear weapon. very lethal. it would wipe out a
in europe. every single european country collapsed. >> let me make one suggestion, bill. if you think it's only the bishops and pastors with the responsibility to do this you are wrong. >> they're the leaders. >> bill, there are different types of leaders, and catholic lay people, christian lay people have responsibility from their own places of work and their own places of leadership to stand up and to believe and to profess their beliefs and to do it joyfully. >> this isn't a catholic issue. you protestants out there, and you unaffiliated christians, we're all in the same soup bowl here. >> not just christians and catholics. people of belief. >> bill: people who admire the philosophy. >> the religion of christianity. >> bill: we're not going to debate that now. >> it's also a religion. >> bill: it's a religion but it's a philosophy. >> absolutely that too. >> bill: that is being administered by different religions. >> that's true. >> bill: we will have you back for that discussion. >> i couldn't let you get away from w. that. >> i have to wisen you up. i'm going to be excommunicated i
to the soviet union, through europe. through his imprisonment and her traveling around the country. yet, they would try to explain to each other, they had other lovers, she was married and yet it was always that relationship, their friends would say there's really nothing like it. you can't come between it. >> the heart of this remarkable story, a passage for you and for, of course, your father and everything that he contributed over all of those years and congratulations. rave reviews from the "new york times." >> thank you. >> this is a very big deal. >> thank you so much. >> we will be right back. veteran former congressman jack brooks has died. he represented southeast texas for 42 years. he died tuesday night at the age of 89. brooks was in the dallas motorcade when john f. kennedy was assassinated in 1963 and can be seen on air force one standing behind jackie kennedy when lyndon johnson took the oath of office later that day. he was one of the last holdouts of an era when democrats dominated texas politics. brooks supported civil rights and refused to sign the segregation souther
of england. commentary from mario draghi will be very important about the state of affairs in europe. there's an analyst meeting tomorrow. a lot of this is tied to stronger revenue growth. and there's an analyst meeting tomorrow on hombres. i like both stocks. >> thanks a lot, stephanie. chris, what are you looking for. 30 seconds on the clock. what do you want to look at to move our money? >> the major impact is looking at the fiscal cliff. any compromise close to that is going to give the market some upward swing. the gop is under extreme pressure since president obama is definitely going to be seeing a wealthy tax added to it. on the economic news, little light tomorrow with initial claims at about 390,000, but the big story is really friday as we look to the jobs report. we believe that the effect of the payroll will be at 50,000 range due to the effect of hurricane sandy which could put our unemployment up to an 8% rate. >> all right. we'll be watching that. thanks very much to you both. we appreciate it. of course we'll be looking at this market and whether or not it loses the steam c
this morning as we've seen. some of that has to do more with europe than it does with washington. but what is your reasoning for why wall street hasn't displayed more of an impact from this fiscal cliff nonsense? >> thomas, what wall street hates most of all is uncertainty and it's counterintuitive, there's actually plenty of certainty now. what's going to be certain is taxes are going up. either we go off the cliff or the curb and then taxes rise for everybody and then maybe they get repealed for the middle class and others or we reach a deal and taxes go up for the wealthiest 2% and everybody else breathes a sigh of relief. there's some $2 trillion in cash sitting on the balance sheets of corporate america waiting to be put to work. the reason it hasn't been put to work is because of uncertainty. taxes are going to go up, the deficit is going to be reduced, some of that money is going to be released. just like ed schultz said, this is all very good news for the american economy. >> so basically the uncertainty is what's providing the certainty moving forward because people across the cou
in the economy. certainly europe's not any help. what's happening in china and japan is not any help. then you add on top of it what's coming out of washington. i don't think you should get your hopes up about figuring it out before the end of this year. i think there's a pretty deept chance we go over the cliff and then try to sort it out in the beginning of the year. >> lovely. >> joe, when did 146,000 jobs become good? have we become so pessimistic -- have our expectations come so low we're cheering 146,000 when we should be well over 200? >> plus the downward revisions for the previous two months. >> although, those revisions were almost all in government. mandy makes a good point. 150,000 a month, which has been the average over the past is a months or so, is not great. if this was a normal recovery, we'd be growing at 4% instead of 2 on gdp. employment would be well over 250. however, the good news in today's report was if you look at the household survey, there was clearly a hurricane effect in these numbers. we might actually have printed over 200 absent hurricane sandy. i would argue
're getting cool in the later years. >> all right, zach, let's move on. first of all europe's stocks are having are very good run. in fact stocks almost all around the world are having a very good run. they ain't doing too badly here in the usa. fiscal cliff or not. what do you make of that? >> first of all, we obviously see these things in terms of one-year period. if you add up january 1 of 2011 through let's say december 31st, 2012, a two-year period, let's say the markets end up a little bit more they're still going to be up about 8% annualized for two years. which is a really good compared to 1 1/2% on a 10-year note. but hardly what you would call this massive bull market a la the 1990s and 1980s. >> it's nice. but zach, if i could have had 8% a year for the last 15 years, you have to be in better shape than how i actually am. in the last 15 years it hasn't done anything. >> i think this is a testament to the fact the only game in town, you do talk about this a lot, larry, is that companies are net net relative to national economies better run and making money. so if you're goi
will slow and slip into double digit recession like europe right now is experiencing. comes as more bad news on the jobs front as 350,000 americans have left the labor force which is a good indication that a real recovery is nowhere in sight. now, let's get right to the bottom line. you, the american people in american pay zero federal income tax. tell me what part of that is not fair? most taxpayers pay close to more than 50 cents of every dollar they make. they pay the state, the local, the fatigue government in taxes. what america should be addressing is two things. one, we should be addressing generational theft. we now as a country borrow 40 cents of every dollar that the government spends, and we've accumulated 16 trillion dollars in debt. now, in 2008 obama called nine trillion dollars in debt. he said that was irresponsible, unpatriotic. to say this another way, we're literally stealing money from our children and our grandchildren. now, this is the kind of generational theft that has never happened in this country until now, and neerlt part neits addressing this on a regular basis.
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